Cheers and tears as the clock strikes Brexit

Credit: Reuters Studio
Published on February 1, 2020 - Duration: 01:57s

Cheers and tears as the clock strikes Brexit

Brexiteers got their long-awaited celebration late on Friday, but for remainers, it was a bleak moment Britain leaves the EU divided over one of the most dramatic shifts in its recent history.

Lucy Fielder reports.

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Cheers and tears as the clock strikes Brexit

Nostalgia, patriotism and defiance as the clock strikes Brexit.

For its supporters, a long-awaited celebration outside parliament, led by Mr Brexit, Nigel Farage.

The United Kingdom slipped out of the European Union late on Friday, turning its back on the project to build a united power from the ruins of World War Two.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) PRO-BREXIT SUPPORTER, NOVELIST, ALAN GOODING, 72, SAYING: "I can't believe how we put up with Europe for so long as we did.

All the insults they flung at us, our prime minister, our country, our queen.

Now we're rid of them." (SOUNDBITE) (English) PRO-BREXIT SUPPORTER, GOLF CLUB MANAGER, DAVID BEAL, 50, SAYING: "Yeah, relieved, no second referendum.

Fantastic." A different kind of party for these British expats in southern Spain.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) BAR 'ALIOLI' OWNER PAUL DARWENT SAYING: "It's a sad day for everybody and it was rather stay at home and be miserable or I thought, well c'mon let's get together, let's have a party." Brexit is Britain's biggest shift since it lost its global empire.

Remainers fear shrinking influence, and the loss of freedom of movement.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) ARTIST CARMEN MYERS, BRITISH LIVING IN SPAIN, SAYING: "I'm a widow today because I feel very sad about leaving the whole of Europe.

It has been one of the great things in my life is belonging to Europe, being able to travel where I want." Brexit weakens the European Union too, though you wouldn't know it from this mock-up boxing match between the British prime minister and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, staged by Dutch artists.

Boris Johnson was the one left reeling.

Outside parliament in Scotland, which voted to remain, a pro-EU rally formed.

Epic opportunity or grave mistake -- Brexit has deeply divided Britain.

Though the Union Jack came down in Brussels, little will change at first.

Britain enters a transition that will keep it a member until the end of the year in all but name.

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