REFILE- What caused Lion Air's Boeing 737 Max to go down last year?

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me
Published on April 5, 2019 - Duration: 01:00s

REFILE- What caused Lion Air's Boeing 737 Max to go down last year?

Boeing is under scrutiny as two of its aircrafts have crashed in less than a year.

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REFILE- What caused Lion Air's Boeing 737 Max to go down last year?

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Boeing is under scrutiny as two of its aircrafts have crashed in less than a year.

In October of 2018, Lion Air Flight JT610 flew from Jakarta and crashed in the waters off of Java.

The aircraft was a Boeing 737 Max 8 which ended up killing all 189 passengers and crew members aboard, according to the Washington Post.

An investigative report release in November of last year says a malfunctioning sensor was one of the reasons the flight crashed.

The aircraft's sensor sent faulty data to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which caused an alert that the plane was in danger when it was not.

This led the system to automatically position the plane's nose downward in order to prevent a stall.

Since the reading was erroneous, the pilot had to struggle to correct the plane's position.

The pilot was unsuccessful in his attempts to save the plane, which crashed into the sea 11 minutes after take off.

According to the Washington Post, investigators are looking to see if there are similarities between the Lion Air crash and the recent plane crash in Ethiopia as both flights crashed shortly after take-off and at low altitudes.

China, Indonesia and Singapore have now banned all 737 Max 8 aircrafts from their airspaces in the wake of the two plane crashes, The New York Times reports.

RUNDOWN SHOWS: 1.

Aircraft in the sky 2.

Plane sensors 3.

Automatic system sense the plane is in danger when it isn't 4.

Pilot trying to save the plane VOICEOVER (in English): "In October of 2018, Lion Air Flight JT610 flew from Jakarta and crashed in the waters off of Java." "According to the Washington Post , the aircraft was also a Boeing 737 Max 8 which ended up killing all 189 passengers and crew members aboard." "An investigative report release in November of last year says a malfunctioning sensor was one of the reasons the flight crashed." "The aircraft's sensor sent faulty data to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which caused an alert that the plane was in danger when it was not." "This led the system to automatically position the plane's nose downward in order to prevent a stall." "Since the reading was erroneous, the pilot had to struggle to correct the plane's position." "The pilot was unsuccessful in his attempts to save the plane, which crashed into the sea 11 minutes after take off." SOURCES: The Washington Post, The New York Times https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/report-on-airline-crash-that-killed-189-people-draws-few-conclusions/2018/11/27/a07b833c-f274-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.425e686f871f https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/03/10/with-ethiopian-airlines-crash-another-new-boeing-max-jet-goes-down/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.5203fbfb448b https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/world/africa/boeing-ethiopian-airlines-plane-crash.html https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/world/asia/air-lion-crash-610.html *** For story suggestions please contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw For technical and editorial support, please contact: Asia: +61 2 93 73 1841 Europe: +44 20 7542 7599 Americas and Latam: +1 800 738 8377

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