Japan's Takeda no longer IOC member

Credit: Reuters - Sports
Published on March 26, 2019 - Duration: 00:31s

Japan's Takeda no longer IOC member

Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) chief Tsunekazu Takeda, who is under investigation in France for suspected corruption and will step down from his role in June, is no longer an International Olympic Committee member, the IOC said on Tuesday.

Advertisement

Japan's Takeda no longer IOC member

SHOWS: LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND (MARCH 26, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE (IOC) SPOKESMAN, MARK ADAMS, SAYING ABOUT JAPAN'S IOC CHIEF TAKEDA STEPPING DOWN FROM ROLE: "On Tsunekazu Takeda, former IOC member, the IOC EB recognised the resignation of IOC member, Tsunekazu Takeda.

With this recognition by the IOC Executive Board and in accordance to the IOC regulations, the cessation of his IOC membership takes immediate effect.

The IOC Executive Board expressed its highest respect for his decision and insisted once more on the presumption of his innocence." STORY: Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) chief Tsunekazu Takeda, who is under investigation in France for suspected corruption and will step down from his role in June, is no longer an International Olympic Committee member, the IOC said on Tuesday (March 26).

Takeda said last week he would step down from the JOC when his term ends and would also resign from the IOC.

The Olympic body, however, said his membership ended on Tuesday.

French prosecutors have questioned Takeda in Paris and placed him under formal investigation in December for suspected corruption in Tokyo's successful bid to host the 2020 Summer Games.

Takeda had been head of the JOC since 2001 and his resignation leaves a cloud hanging over both the national committee and the organisers of the Tokyo 2020 Games.

IOC also announced that weightlifting will be given the green light for inclusion in the Paris 2024 Olympics once an anti-doping agreement is in place, ending 18 months of uncertainty for the sport's future in the Games.

The IOC said in 2017 that weightlifting had to reform its anti-doping procedures or risk missing out on the Paris Olympics after scores of doping cases in the sport in the past decade alone had tarnished its image as well as the Olympics.

But on Tuesday (March 26) the Olympic body said it was satisfied with progress in that respect, with an agreement pending between the International Testing Agency (ITA) and the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF).

The main condition was the agreement with the ITA which should take place soon.

You are here

You might like